THE ARTISTIC LIFE – Living the creative life in everything we do

Archive for the ‘Public Art’ Category

Weekly Photo #36

Here’s photo 36, a close-up of some public art at Town Center, with an abstract pattern backdrop of the various buildings and windows. Taken with my iPhone.

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This Little Piggy

Hello again! To make up for lost time, I’ll be sharing some items with you, so we can all catch up. On June 29, eight pig statues, including mine, were revealed in the town of Smithfield and one was even symbolically “christened” (Have you ever been to a pig christening before? This was a first for me.) Here is the town’s link to their Olden Days photo album, pig reveal included. You’ll see some photos of children with my pig, which makes me happy, as I wanted the design to appeal to kids. Below is a picture of me showing one side (pigs in the pillory) of Cultural Pig.

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Non-toxic Oil Painting

If you’ve been reading my blog, you’ll know that I’ve been trying to live a more non-toxic life as part of my fight against thyroid cancer. Well, I’m also an artist. As I’ve just accepted a new oil painting commission, I’m researching ways to make the painting process safer and less toxic. As many people have become concerned about the health and environmental effects of the products we use, I thought I’d share what I’ve learned. So far, here are a few suggestions I’ve found:

1) Use good hygiene and cleaning methods. Definitely don’t put your brushes anywhere near your mouth. Supposedly, VanGogh ingested traces of his oil paints as he worked, and this may have contributed to his mental and physical decline. Also, try to wear gloves as you paint. I know in the past, I’ve been guilty of getting oil colors all over my hands as I paint. Even though I’d scrub my hands afterward, remnants of stubborn color would still remain. This can be absorbed into your body, along with any toxic ingredients, so you should minimize skin contact.

2) Use good ventilation. Outdoor Plein Air painting is great. If this is not an option, paint with as many windows and doors open as possible. Paint in a garage with the doors open. Or use a studio with a built-in ventilation system and/or lots of windows. Use fans and air purifiers as well. I have a small window, but also use a purifier and a fan to blow any fumes out the open window. Put a ventilation mask on if you are still concerned.

3) Check the ACMI (Art & Creative Materials Institute, Inc.) labels. This is a non-profit association that tests for toxicity in paints and media. Look for the AP (Approved Product) certified nontoxic seal on your individual paint tubes (every color may be different, even within a specific brand or line of paints). Avoid the CL label which indicates that caution should be used. In general, avoid the Cadmium colors and the Cobalt colors, including Cerulean Blue. Lead White (also known as Flake White) has been banned in most countries because of its toxicity, now selling the safer Flake White Replacement color. Most major art supply catalogs and websites will indicate the labels for each paint color. For more information, see the ACMI website.

4) Avoid turpentine and most thinners and mediums. In my research, it appears that Walnut Oil is safe and a quality choice. There is also M Graham Walnut Alkyd Medium which is non-toxic, if you’d like a fast drying medium (oils such as walnut oil are not fast drying). I have a bottle of water soluble Stand Oil at home that has the AP label. There may be other limited choices, but use caution.

5) Use simple soap and water for cleaning your brushes and hands. My art professors in college suggested we use regular dish soap for washing brushes. This is easy on the budget, as well as health. I used to swirl the brushes into the palm of my hand with soap to clean them. Now I will use a clean surface, such as my palette, to swirl, to limit the skin exposure.

6) Make sure to close all paint and medium containers as soon as you are done with them and clean up thoroughly.

With these precautions, you should be able to oil paint safely and enjoyably. If you know of any more safety tips with regards to oil painting, please let me know!

Pigs Go Public

I hope everyone had a great weekend. I had a productive one…I taught my mom how to use her laptop, and, in turn, she taught me how to knit! Maybe this will be another crafty skill to incorporate into the artistic life.

Also, I recently discussed how my design was chosen for Smithfield’s Public Art Project. The press release has been sent out and the pigs are going public. Not only will I be having an interview with the Smithfield Times as one of the artists, but I’ve also made the WAVY news! Hopefully, there will be more press as time goes on and as the pigs make progress and are revealed. So far, I’ve primed my pig with gesso and have drawn the design on both sides. Next step will be to start painting the pig characters on the pig. Will keep you updated! Below is a photo of my pig (we’ll name her “Bess”) being primed on her belly…

Smithfield Pig Being Primed on Her Belly

My Pig Being Primed on Her Belly

This Little Piggy Went to Smithfield…My 1st Public Art Project

Let the “pig” jokes fly…I have been awarded the opportunity to participate in my first public art project! My design was juried and accepted by the Porcine Parade Panel, for a public art project in Smithfield, VA! For updates on this project, go the Smithfield Arts website. This will be a fun opportunity to bring the community and the arts together and promote the culture and tourism of the lovely historic town of Smithfield. You know about the well-known Cow Parade…where cities displayed custom artisticly painted and decorated cows designed by artists. Many cities have since used various animals in similar public art projects to promote tourism and excitement regarding the arts. Well, Smithfield is now living “high on the hog” with its Porcine project, where selected artists will paint/decorate pig statues, symbolizing the importance of the pig in the history and culture of Smithfield (we all know about Smithfield ham, right?)

I will be busy prepping and painting my hog for the next couple months to get ready for the big reveal in April (as I squeal with delight in hog heaven)!

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